Lay down Sally


There is nothing that is wrong
In wanting you to stay here with me
I know you’ve got somewhere to go
But won’t you make yourself at home and stay with me?
And don’t you ever leave
Lay down, Sally, and rest you in my arms
Don’t you think you want someone to talk to?
Lay down, Sally, no need to leave so soon
I’ve been trying all night long just to talk to you
The sun ain’t nearly on the rise
And we still got the moon and stars above
Underneath the velvet skies
Love is all that matters
Won’t you stay with me?
And don’t you ever leave
Lay down, Sally, and rest you in my arms
Don’t you think you want someone to talk to?
Lay down, Sally, no need to leave so soon
I’ve been trying all night long just to talk to you
I long to see the morning light.
Eric Clapton

When I was three, my parents divorced. Pretty sure I mentioned this as it shaped my life. Parents, please hear me: Do not fall into your parents’ loop of giving up. Your kids did not ask to be here, and they need both parents. While there are circumstances that I feel absolutely warrant a divorce, please don’t give up. Your children need you.

Getting side tracked so let me jump back.

When we left Westwood Drive in 1976, we moved to an apartment not far from our home. I’ll be completely transparent here: At 3 years old this was an adventure for me! Everything was new, and I was happy except for missing my daddy. He used to have to drive by that apartment every day, and it must have killed him knowing our mother moved on and took us with her. When I say us, I mean Jilene and me. La Donna stayed with dad—thank God.

Within the year mom remarried and we moved to Bristolville, Ohio, about 20 minutes from where we lived prior. Mother and her new husband built a house onto an existing farmer’s small barn.

One of the brilliant things about moving to godforsaken no man’s land Bristolville is that you have space and privacy. No one can hear or see you for that matter. I am sure that is the point. We lived on about 12 acres, and the drive was two football fields back from the road.

Point? We had land.

But back to the point of this blog today, which is to introduce a friend. In fact she became my best girl for a long, long time. Let me introduce you: Her name is Sally with huge brown eyes and brown hair.

You see, one of the nicest things mother and her partner ever did for us was buy us horses. Sally was a warm brown Shetland pony and was coupled with a horse named Pete. They were the most precious pair you ever want to meet. He was grey and tall, and she was brown and so short; they were inseparable. If I wanted to ride her, it was darn difficult as she walked like a turtle unless he was with her.

I would take her out throw on her bridle and ride—no supervision just Sally and me.

One summer day I rode her to the end of the driveway. Now getting down the drive was not all that fun. She turtled the whole way down, but the moment she turned around she took off like a bullet making it worth the wait.

That summer day we made it down the drive, but as she turned to sprint back, I fell off. I must have hit my head because the next thing I remember was my mother standing over me. Sally had gone back the house and whinnied until mother came out. She then directed Mom to my body lying unconscious on the ground two football fields away. She was and always will be my hero. Although she is gone now, I am so grateful for the rides and especially the friendship she gave a lonely little girl.

So many times, I brushed her while tears fell to the ground. She listened and loved me. Can animals really understand? Did she hear all the secrets I told her? Did she really love me as I loved her?

She died in my teen years and in a way so did I. The not-so-innocent little girl buried her pony and her heart all in the same day. Sally is so much a part of who I am that without telling her story, I can’t paint the whole picture of my childhood.

God sent me Sally. He sends us people along the way that walk with us on our path. Sometimes we wander or trip and even fall off the path. Thank God for the Sallies in our lives who go get help to pull us out of the pit. Thank God for the Sallies who love us no matter what.

Even if your Sally is slow like a turtle, boring and stubborn to your ideas: Don’t give up!!!! She will turn the corner. The moment she sees who you really are she will run like heck until her feet take off the ground, and she canters two football fields while you hold on for dear life.

You have a purpose, and so does your Sally. I know it’s hard to stay focused on the prize when you feel like you’re never gonna be free to run back to the barn. I promise if you stay positive, stay in prayer, meditate, stay in shape and work out, you will be free.

Part of our journey here on earth is to learn how to walk free of bondage the enemy wants us to live in. Even the crappy part of my childhood with mother’s partner, taught me something very, very valuable: I know how to fight and never give up. That is more precious than gold.

I want you all to learn to fight like the warriors you are and never give up. As long as your life is lined up with God’s will for you, you will be free.

But…there are some things you need to lay down and give up—deep down, you already know what they are.

So here is what we are gonna do: Please, readers, comment what you are laying down today. Don’t wait. Be inspired and unbridled and transparent. Let it go. The truth can’t set you free while you’re holding on to a lie. Let it out and let it go. I am here. I am listening to you. I wrote this for you. Yes you. I dedicate this blog today to all the Sallies out there. Untether your soul and run home

9 thoughts on “Lay down Sally”

  1. Melissa, Thank you for this blog! I also had a Sally as a young girl. Her name was Buttercup and she was an itty bitty Shetland pony the color of golden yellow with the patience of Job. Tracey and I would climb on a 5 gallon bucket to get on and ride her. We were so very young! Tracey, always the brave one, and I, always a little scared, spent hours with that little pony escaping the turmoil that was a permanent resident in our home. I do believe the three of us learned to trudge along in spite of our environment. The stories of childhood often seem to get “repainted” and all those old deep hurts covered up. Thank you for reminding me that as unpleasant as some of the memories are, they also made me stronger, but most of all thank you for the encouragement to let it go and keep letting it go until it’s gone! <3

    1. Thank you for sharing. It’s amazing to me how there is so many lives out there living the same story and no one ever talked about it when we were little . Too afraid I suppose. I’m blessed I was able to bring up the memory of buttercup. Have you read the rest of my blog? There are more to come so stay tuned. Thanks again

  2. I was in shock reading this! Oblivious to the things we grew up with and around are an understatement with me! I never knew so many grew up around me in such crazy circumstances! I am sorry, I love ya! I’m laying down the resentment I have let fester in me for over 30 years about the little town we grew up in, and the things that happen with those people in it! I had a “Sally”, her name was Muffin!!

    1. Julie do I know you? I’m happy to be transparent to help all of you not be alone. This is what life is supposed to be.

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